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Monday, July 20, 2020 | History

4 edition of The Disposal of Long Lived and Highly Radioactive Wastes (Royal Society Discussion Volumes) found in the catalog.

The Disposal of Long Lived and Highly Radioactive Wastes (Royal Society Discussion Volumes)

R. A. Loughton

The Disposal of Long Lived and Highly Radioactive Wastes (Royal Society Discussion Volumes)

by R. A. Loughton

  • 190 Want to read
  • 26 Currently reading

Published by Cambridge University Press .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Nuclear power & engineering,
  • Waste management,
  • Earth Sciences - General,
  • Science / Earth Sciences,
  • Science

  • The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages198
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL7737793M
    ISBN 100521350719
    ISBN 109780521350716
    OCLC/WorldCa233812168

    Highly active radioactive waste generates significant levels of heat and this must to be taken into account in the management strategy. In its publication, Classification of Radioactive Waste (), the IAEA describes 6 categories or classes of waste. 1. Exempt waste 2. Very short-lived waste 3. Very low level waste 4. The safe management of nuclear and radioactive wastes is a subject that has recently received considerable recognition due to the huge volume of accumulative wastes and the increased public awareness of the hazards of these wastes. This book aims to cover the practice and research efforts that are currently conducted to deal with the technical difficulties in different radioactive waste.

      Nuclear waste stored in underground containers at the Idaho National Laboratory near Idaho Falls. Low-level radioactive waste is primarily disposed of in highly regulated sites. Photograph: Keith. A review of the Swedish radioactive waste disposal program by the National Academy of Sciences found that country's estimate of several hundred thousand years—perhaps up to one million years—being necessary for waste isolation "fully justified.".

      1 The issue of radioactive waste disposal. The nature of radioactive wastes. The concept of geological disposal. Evaluating repository safety. Key uncertainties in safety calculations. Requirements for supporting natural data. Natural analogue studies. Other field-based studies of natural systems. Site characterisation. Book Edition: 1.   Unconventional nuclear reactors may reduce the level of some nuclear isotopes in the spent fuel they produce, but that won’t change what really drives requirements for our future nuclear waste repository: the heat production of spent fuel and amount of long-lived radionuclides in the waste.


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The Disposal of Long Lived and Highly Radioactive Wastes (Royal Society Discussion Volumes) by R. A. Loughton Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Disposal of Long-Lived and Highly Radioactive Wastes: Proceedings of a Royal Society Discussion meeting Held on 30 and 31 may [A. et al (eds. Laughton] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying : A. et al (eds.

Laughton. ICRP Publication Radiation Protection Recommendations as Applied to the Disposal of Long-lived Solid Radioactive Waste: Medicine & Health Science Books Author: ICRP. This handbook is concerned with developing principles and standards for the safe disposal of solid radioactive wastes by burial deep in the Earth's crust.

Radioactive wastes have focussed thinking on long-term environmental protection issues in an unprecedented Edition: 1. PRINCIPLES AND STANDARDS FOR THE DISPOSAL OF LONG-LIVED RADIOACTIVE WASTES Waste Management Series 1. Waste Materials in Construction. The Science and Engineering of Recycling for Environmental Protection Edited by G.R.

Woolley, J.J.J.M. Goumans and P.J. Wainwright 2. Geological Disposal of Radioactive Wastes and Natural Analogues. Geologic Disposal of High-Level Radioactive Waste examines the fundamental knowledge and conditions to be considered and applied by planners and other professionals when establishing national repository concepts, and constructing repositories for the long-term isolation of highly radioactive waste from surrounding crystalline rock.

Such studies are called 'natural analogues'. This book investigates the concept of geological disposal and examines the wide range of natural analogues which have been studied. Lessons learnt from studies of archaeological and natural systems can be used to improve our capabilities for assessing the future safety of a radioactive waste repository.

Four decades ago the disposal of such waste was regarded as a relatively minor matter. Those were the heady days when nuclear fission seemed the answer to the world's energy needs: the two wartime bombs had demonstrated its awesome power, and now it was to be harnessed for the production of electricity, the excavation of canals, even the.

as fuel. Yet, France has a considerable vol-ume of long-lived, highly radioactive waste that is slated for disposal in a deep geologic repository, including vitrified high-level waste from reprocessing, unreprocessed uranium spent fuel, unreprocessed mixed oxide (MOX) spent fuel, and some other long-lived wastes of lower specific activity The book has been updated to include a discussion of the disposal of nuclear waste from non-energy sources, also adding a chapter on the nuclear fuel cycle.

Significant focus is given to the analysis of the various matrices used, especially cement and glass, with further discussion of other matrices, such as bitumen.

The West Lake municipal landfill in Bridgeton, Missouri is not your ordinary solid waste landfill. By virtue of the highly radiotoxic wastes dumped there, it is a de facto nuclear waste disposal site – a legacy of the U.S.

nuclear weapons program (see Figures 1 and 2). The accepted solution for disposing of higher activity and longer-lived radioactive wastes from the nuclear power industry and other sources is engineered emplacement in deep geological disposal facilities (GDFs), situated many hundreds of metres by: The European Commission has endorsed geological disposal as the favoured strategy for dealing with Europe s long-lived radioactive wastes, pointing out that it.

Since the Yucca Mountain project in the U.S. was defunded inthe notion of disposing of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in deep boreholes has been reinvigorated, most recently by private companies proposing to utilize lateral drilling technology to excavate boreholes for SNF disposal in sedimentary rock.

It is claimed that this approach will alleviate site characterization efforts Author: Lindsay Krall, Lindsay Krall, Lindsay Krall, Timothy McCartin, Allison Macfarlane. The disposal of long-lived and highly radioactive wastes: proceedings of a Royal Society Discussion Meeting, held on 30 and 31 May Author: A S Laughton ; Royal Society (Great Britain).

It provides an overview of possible disposal concepts and facilities to be considered for accepting long lived waste, advises on the key factors to be considered when selecting the appropriate disposal approach, and outlines the procedure for selecting the relevant strategy for disposal of long lived low and intermediate level waste.

The Industrial Centre for Geological Disposal, or Cigeo, is a deep geological disposal facility for radioactive waste to be built in France. It will serve for disposal of highly radioactive long-lived waste produced by France's current fleet of nuclear facilities, until they are dismantled, as well as from reprocessing of spent fuel from nuclear power plants.

The book describes and assesses current concepts for long-term disposal of highly radioactive waste. Different types of rock are discussed and assessed with respect to practical difficulties in construction of a repository, and the efficiency in isolating radioactive waste.

The high cost means that such a method of waste disposal could only be appropriate for separated high-level waste (HLW) or spent fuel (i.e. long-lived highly radioactive material that is relatively small in volume). Placing high-level radioactive waste (HLW) in a deep geological repository has been the solution accepted by the technical community for more than 40 years.

separate and/or convert the long lived radioactive elements into shorter lived, less hazardous forms. Known as ‘partitioning and transmutation’, or P&T, this process results in a smaller volume of waste with considerably less radiotoxicity.

Partitioning and Transmutation Spent nuclear fuel discharged from a nuclear reactor is highly. The book assesses current ideas for long-term disposal of highly radioactive waste.

Different types of rock are discussed and assessed with respect to practical difficulties in constructing a repository, and the efficiency of isolating radioactive waste.

Some of these new elements remain radioactive for hundreds of thousands of years, presenting a much more complicated disposal problem. But what if these “transuranics” could themselves be split? Yet more energy would be derived — but perhaps more importantly, the resulting waste, while still radioactive, would be far less long-lived.Definitions.

High-level waste is the highly radioactive waste material resulting from the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel, including liquid waste produced directly in reprocessing and any solid material derived from such liquid waste that contains fission products in sufficient concentrations; and other highly radioactive material that is determined, consistent with .